Home of the 43rd Ward Democrats - Michele Smith Committeeman

featuring political news and community information for 43rd ward residents and businesses -
2527 N. Lincoln Avenue - 773-661-2133

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Lincoln Park Hospital Public Meeting - Tuesday, November 30th!

Ald. Daley and the City of Chicago Department of Zoning and Land Use Planning are hosting a community meeting for the public to review and comment on the latest proposal for the redevelopment of the Lincoln Park Hospital property.


Tuesday, November 30th
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Lincoln Park High School
2001 N. Orchard
(North end of building - entrances closest to Oz Park)


In my last Newsletter, I detailed the proposed plan, how it has changed and the community view that commercial use is not appropriate at this location.

I am particularly concerned about retail development in the ward. If we cannot fill existing vacancies, I feel it is reasonable and prudent to at least question the creation of more retail space.

I believe the community process has been very effective in this instance, as is clear from the fact that the developers have come up with an amended plan based upon public input.

The neighbors most directly affected by this development, many of whom I heard from since our last newsletter, are overwhelmingly opposed to commercial development at this location. You can read more about the public response to this latest plan in the most recent Skyline newspaper.

Of the neighbors who have contacted me directly, here are some examples of their responses:
"Any commercial use at this site would add significantly to congestion and safety concerns"
"No, no, no to the large grocery store"
"We are congested enough"
"As it stands...this plan will do permanent damage to our beloved area"
"This planned development is inconsistent with the decades-old neighborhood planning that has made Lincoln Park a nationally celebrated neighborhood"
"I am not in favor of any plan that would include a large grocery or retail store at Lincoln and Webster"
"No commercial on Webster"


The original plan, still the only plan on file with the City, is based on a B3-2 zoning and would allow for much more commercial development - up to 75,000 square feet of commercial space.

Please come out and join with your neighbors on Tuesday, November 30th at Lincoln Park High School. Let your voices be heard.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Detailed Analysis of Revised Proposal for Lincoln Park Hospital

To repeat some background from a previous newsletter , the Lincoln Park Hospital site contains 42 city lots and, based on the underlying residential zoning for the surrounding area, would support up to 330 units of housing – a mix of single family homes, townhomes, and 3 and 4 story apartments.

The revised proposal, based on plans posted on the Lincoln Central Association site , would contain:

• 120 residential units in a twelve story building
• 40 units in a 55’ high building on Grant
• A 20,000 square foot store (more on this later), and parking garage with 255 spaces
• Over 95,000 square feet of medical and professional office space – leaving this leaves the building on Geneva Terrace as office space, instead of the originally-proposed senior housing.

The Commercial Portion

The community has been strongly against creating a retail corridor on Webster. In response, the developer has proposed that just one store would be built in the existing parking garage: a 20,000 square foot grocery store.

The new Apple Store on North Avenue is 6,500 square feet. The proposed store is more than three times that size. Will this really be a “walkable” type of store, when the principle amenity of the site is 255 parking spaces? Common sense tells us that this is a “destination” type of grocery store, bringing not only residents, but many others who will drive to the store.

We know that there are 750,000 square feet of vacant retail in our area already. Should we take this occasion to create a new retail center in a different area, surrounded by townhouses and an historic district? Further, take a look at this drawing from the developer’s presentation. It shows , to scale, the size of the delivery trucks that will be coming to Webster Ave. The backing up of these trucks alone will stop traffic on Webster. And the new customers coming to the stores and offices will further congest this residential street.

The plan adds a truck loading docks on Webster just to the west of the main garage door. Plus, there is a new garage door on the north side at the very east end of the tower building. All of these moves are contrary to the prior agreements with neighbors (the idea previously was one garage door as far west as possible to minimize noise and congestion in the neighboring residential area). And while we always have to be careful pushing strollers, this does create a truck and car intensive use just east of Oz Park.

Ultimately, more and different retail is possible on the site. According to the draft ordinance, the “underlying zoning” for the site would be “B2-3.” B2 zoning permits the following uses:

Elderly housing
Restaurants
Banks
Food and Beverage Retail sales, with liquor sales as an accessory use
Offices
Medical
Hair Salons, Nail Salons
Dry Cleaners
General Retail Sales – groceries, pharmacies, clothing, etc.
Children’s Activities Facility

The proposal, as drafted, does not prohibit retail on Grant or on the north side of Webster, and our zoning code makes no differentiation among the uses listed above.

There are no size limitations on any single business in this kind of district up to 25,000 square feet. So, although the proposed plan limits the store in the parking garage to a single 20,000 square foot store, the “underlying zoning” would permit stores, and more than one store, in the buildings across the street.

The Overall Density of the Site

Just to give you an idea of the scale of this development in contrast to the immediate neighborhood, the proposal contemplates up to 395,487 total square feet of development, almost one third more than if the site was entirely residential. And it packs 170 new houses on a block that today contains fewer than 10 houses.

What does the “-3” in “B2-3” mean? The “-3” stands for limits on density, height and bulk.
In a “-3” area, all development is measured the Floor Area Ratio (FAR), which is 3. That means that the total square footage of all development is three times the lot size. That means that the total square foot of the retail, residential, office and parking on the site is allowed to be 3 X 131,829 sq. ft = 395,487 total square feet of development. This is huge and is the largest FAR allowed.

Parking rules for “-3” zoning is: “None for first 10,000 square feet then 2.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet.” That means for a 20,000 square foot store, there would only have to be 25 parking spaces. This proposal has over 225 spaces, which initially sounds ample. However, this is a double edged sword. It means that the development could support much more retail and be completely legal under the code.

What About the Future?

Under our city’s zoning code, if a planned development is initially approved, no further approvals are needed to change the planned development if “the development involves only reuse of an existing building and the building’s height is not being increased.” Therefore, even if the current developer claims that the development will have “only” one store, there is nothing that the community could do in the future should an additional store or stores be installed on the site. This is all the more apparent because the development indeed contains enough parking under our city code for more than one 20,000 square foot store.

But, fundamentally, the issue is: should there be retail and office space on this site? The area has transitioned to residential uses over the decades, and the proposed use of Webster would add multiple loading and access drives (over 150 linear feet of curb), which is not compatible with low density residential use. At the same time, we know that the large Children’s Memorial site, on Lincoln Avenue, a commercial street, will be developed soon.

Our alderman, Vi Daley, has said, to date, that commercial use here is not appropriate. What do you think? Let me know.

The Residential Portion

The developer’s plans show a twelve story building, under the claim that this would be no higher than the current building. The twelve stories are achieved by adding two floors to the building to match the height of the current utility tower on the hospital. The mechanical penthouse is not currently visible from the street, as would be these 2 additional floors. Instead, the developer adds his own mechanical penthouse, increasing the height even further.

The Height of the Building

Under the city’s zoning code, any building over 110’ is considered a “tall” (hi-rise) building. This building would be 152’ 5” high, before mechanicals, backing immediately over historic homes on the same blocks. In addition, the bulk of the buildings would be expanded substantially from their current configuration.

In contrast, in a B2 district, which the developers state would be the “underlying zoning,” the maximum height for residential space over commercial space is 65 feet, which better reflects the character of the surrounding area. These contradictions do make it seem like the developer is trying to have it all.

The Number of Units

While the developer’s fact sheet only shows 160 units, the zoning they seek would allow them to build up to 330 units. 1

Summary

It seems as though this development is a large scale, mixed use development, in sharp contrast to the low rise residential that entirely surrounds it – a two story townhouse development to the south, and 3 and 4 store houses to the north. Do you think it is appropriate here?

1 Although the fact sheets states that the number of proposed residential units is 160, the number of residential units allowed is based on the “minimum lot area” per unit, which is 400 square feet per unit for “-3” zoning. To figure out the number of units, you take the total area of the development (131,829 sq. ft.) and divide by 400 sq. ft. = 330 units. In other words, even under the “revised” proposal, the developer could build 330 units – perhaps convert the office building on Geneva Terrace to housing later? This would be a major change to the development and would seem to require full planned development procedures.

Friday, October 29, 2010

Election Day Tuesday November 2nd!

Your Vote Really Counts on Tuesday

Now, more than ever, it is important to make our voices heard and speak out to protect our rights! To ensure that, 43rd Ward Democrats have endorsed Pat Quinn for Governor and Alexi Giannoulias for Senate along with other progressive candidates. (See our Endorsements). Governor Quinn has a long history of standing up for a Woman's Right to Privacy and Choice without restriction. We also need to protect our Senate and House Majorities.

Toni Preckwinkle, for County Board President, has always distinguished herself as a progressive leader and Forrest Claypool, for County Assessor, stands as a voice for reform in his race.

The consequences of sitting this election out are dire. The Republican slate is filled with politicians who are out of touch with our times. Bill Brady disrespects women and their abilities. Not only does he oppose a Woman's Right to Choose, even in cases of rape and incest, but Brady has voted against equal pay for equal work and is in favor of lowering the minimum wage. On the local front, as well as the national, we simply cannot afford inaction.


Volunteer with 43rd Ward Dems on Election Day

Have you got any time to spare on Election Day, November 2nd? A couple of hours will help. Can you drive folks to the Polling Place? Answer phones? Help deliver lunches to our Election Judges?
The polls are open from 6:00 am until 7:00 pm. Please contact us at michele43rd@gmail.com if you're available any time during the day.


Rally with
President Obama!

Midway Plaisance Park
1130 Midway Plaisance North
Chicago, IL 60637

Saturday, October 30th
Doors open: 4:30 p.m.

The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

For security reasons, please avoid bringing bags to the rally if at all possible -- you should expect airport-like security. No signs, banners, or laptops are permitted.



Friday, October 22, 2010

Rally for Choice!

Rally for Pat Quinn
Stop Bill Brady and Protect Our Rights
!

Co- Hosts:
43rd Ward Democrats
Personal PAC

Monday, October 25th
6:00 pm
2527 N. Lincoln Avenue

Featured Speaker:
Terry Cosgrove - President and CEO
Personal PAC

Please RSVP at:
rallyforquinn@gmail.com

43rd Ward Democrats endorsed Pat Quinn for Governor. Now, more than ever, we must put our feet to the street and back our endorsed candidate. Pat Quinn has a long history of advocating for women. Pat supports a Woman's Right to Privacy and Choice without restriction. Pat stands firmly against salary discrimination based on gender and is committed to protecting victims of domestic violence.

Bill Brady is opposed to a Woman's Right To Choose and believes that even women who are the victims of rape and incest should be denied their reproductive rights. He has repeatedly voted against insurance coverage for pap smears and mammograms. Bill Brady will put the women of Illinois at serious risk. He even supports Lowering the Minimum Wage, impacting millions of working women.

There's Too Much at Stake!

Monday, September 20, 2010

Become an Election Judge!


The 43rd Ward needs more election judges for the November 2nd Election. There is no better way to learn about the political process and it is a paid position. Please contact us at michele43rd@gmail.com if you're interested in applying or call us at 773-661-2133.

Shop the Steeple!
St. Paul's Rummage Sale
First Ever St. Paul's Rummage Sale
This Saturday, September 18th
8:00 am - 2:00 pm
2335 N. Orchard St.
To find out more, to donate items or to get directions go to:
www.stpaulsrummage.com

They're making rummage joyful at St. Paul's.

43rd Ward Democrats

43rd Ward Democrats will remain fully operational but will no longer be operating out of 2527 N.Lincoln Avenue. You will still regularly get our Newsletter and we will keep you informed on all the issues, especially on all the news you need to make informed decisions in the upcoming November election.

You can look forward to getting information about the judges running for retention who will appear on the November ballot, a Women Against Brady rally in October, precinct work and leafletting for our endorsed candidates and numerous opportunities to volunteer for 43rd Ward Democrats. We will be calling upon you to help out on Election day - Tuesday, November 2nd!

Continue to contact us at 773-661-2133 and we will continue to work for progressive, fiscally responsible candidates. 43rd Ward Democrats, and its membership, remains alive and well!


Thursday, September 2, 2010

43rd Ward Democrats Endorse Claypool!

I have been approached by many members of the community, and many of the voting members of 43rd Ward Democrats, in regards to what should be done about Joe Berrios in his race to be County Assessor. As you will recall, 43rd Ward Democrats did not endorse him in the Primary. We endorsed Ray Figueroa, a man with highly respected progressive credentials.


The alternative would be for 43rd Ward Democrats to endorse someone with a proven record of reform, someone in line with our mission of electing progressive candidates to office. That person is Forrest Claypool and he is running as an Independent.

I called upon the Voting Members of 43rd Ward Democrats to step outside party boundaries and consider an endorsement of Forrest Claypool. I felt that by doing so we actually uphold what is best in our party and send a clear message that "business as usual politics" are not acceptable to us. Nor should they be acceptable to the Democratic Party we want to support and and help shape.

Over the past week Voting Members have cast their ballots - Yes or No - to endorse Forrest Claypool for County Assessor. The final tally of votes on Monday, August 30th resulted in an overwhelming majority vote for endorsement of Forrest Claypool for Cook County Assessor. We are proud to support him.

The Cook County Assessor's office determines your property taxes. We need the Assessor to be a person of the highest integrity, who will eliminate the conflicts of interest which so plague our local government. We hope you learn more about this important race, and join with the 43rd Ward Democrats in electing Forrest and the Democratic candidates who are running in November.

Look What We've Accomplished!

Since I was elected Democratic Committeeman of the 43rd Ward in February 2008, I have accomplished many things beyond the scope of a Committeeman’s designated responsibility to run elections. I have kept to my personal mission of educating and informing the voters of the 43rd Ward and increasing voter turnout to a greater extent than has ever been done in the past . We have introduced candidates for office, as well as elected officials, directly to the voters more than any other ward organization, and kept you informed about matters of local and national importance.

In 2010:
• I’m keeping you informed about important developments in the Lincoln Park Hospital development controversy and building public support to keep future development residential
• Our Candidate Fair introduced voters to more than 55 Candidates running for local and statewide offices in the February Primary.
• Our 43rd Ward Democrats endorsed progressive independent candidates for the February Primary. We did thorough research to help you elect the most qualified judges and other candidates in races that receive little press coverage so you could exercise an informed vote.
• On Election Day, we increased voter turnout by 1600 more people than in the late mid-term election in 2006, a 26% increase.
• Our comprehensive research showed how judges are actually selected in Cook County. I took you behind the scenes of the Democratic Party and told you how slating works.

In 2009:
• Over 300 people (and much of the city’s media) covered our County Board President Candidates Forum, moderated by Andy Shaw, former network political reporter and head of the Better Government Association.
• We introduced Candidates for Illinois State Treasurer, State Comptroller and County Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to the voters at our Meet the Candidates Event.
• The 43rd Ward Democrats’ Candidates Forum in the 5th Congressional District Special Election attracted a crowd of more than 700 people.
• Our Hear from Your Elected Officials event, featuring Congressmen Danny Davis and Mike Quigley and State Representatives Sara Feigenholtz and John Fritchey, allowed constituents to get direct answers from their representatives.
• I cast the deciding vote in the Democratic Party slating session to ensure that the 5th Congressional District Special Election race would be an open primary, leaving the decision to the voters of the district instead of party bosses.
• I took independent stands in Democratic Party matters involving slating.
• Our community meetings introduced 43rd ward voters to newly elected Congressman Mike Quigley and newly appointed County Commissioner Bridget Gainer.
• Over 200 people attended our very successful Second Annual Unity Fundraiser.
• Our Petitioning Event gave volunteer support to 18 local and statewide races and put volunteers in direct contact with candidates and campaigns.
• We hosted successful phone banks to support health care reform.

In 2008:
• I hosted the 43rd Ward Democrats First Meeting where Anita Alvarez, Democratic Candidate for State’s Attorney, was introduced to voters.
• Voter Registration - We registered more than 1,000 new 43rd Ward voters.
• Judge Recruitment – We filled more than 150 Democratic Election Judge slots with a record number of 43rd Ward residents as judges.
• First Annual Unity Fundraiser - The evening was a tremendous success and brought together elected officials and residents from all over the ward.
• You went with me to the Democratic Convention in Denver for an on-the-ground look.
• Our packed Rally for Obama generated 100 students and longtime residents to volunteer to make phone calls, go door-to-door and go to Michigan and Wisconsin to help elect Barack Obama.
• New Ward Office – opened at 2527 N. Lincoln Avenue.
• Our First Election Day – we increased the number of 43rd Ward residents serving as election judges by 100% and a huge number 43rd ward volunteers helped make the day run smoothly.

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

I Got My Share...

... of vegetables, that is. I've been a farmers market shopper as long as they've been in the neighborhood. I've committed myself to healthier cooking and eating and recently learned about Community Supported Agriculture "shares."

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) directly links consumers and farmers. Members make an up-front payment at the beginning of the growing season that contributes to the farm's operating budget. In return, members receive a weekly share of the farm's produce. Sounded like a great way to get me to eat more vegetables and try some new things.

I got my share from Growing Home which is a farm with a unique mission: providing job training for homeless and low-income people in Chicago through organic agriculture. Plus, its office is in the 43rd Ward, right on Clark Street.

Growing Home operates three farm sites, a ten acre farm in Marseilles (Illinois), plots at 58th and Ashland and 51st and Laflin on the South Side. All are certified organic.

I signed on in late May for a full summer CSA "share," and you can see from the photo what beautiful produce I've been getting. I simply pick it up each week from the Green City Market.

Most of the farmers at the Green City Market offer CSAs. Click here to find a list the farmers who offer CSAs in the Chicago Area, just look for "GC" for farms that deliver at the Green City Market.

Cool Fun for a Hot Summer Weekend!

Lincoln Park Arts & Music Festival

Saturday, July 31st and Sunday, August 1st
Saturday - Noon to 10 pm
Sunday - Noon to 9 pm
On Racine between Fullerton and Webster
A gate donation of $7 goes to benefit the
Lincoln Park Chamber of Commerce

Food, Music and Fun in the sun!

Second Annual Chicago Luxury Ice Cream Festival

Friday & Saturday, July 30 & 31
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum
2430 N. Cannon Drive

25 Micro-Creameries, Chefs, Contests and More!

$25 - to purchase tickets go to:
www.chicagoicecreamfestival.com

"We're not referring to your garden-variety, frozen dessert concoctions. We're talking about decadent masterpieces bursting with flavor, dreamed up by some of Chicago's most exciting pastry chefs."


Movies In the Park

City Slickers
Saturday, July 31st
7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

The Oz Park Advisory Council presents City Slickers for a fun night at the movies in the park at sunset.

A perfect summer evening!

Join in to Help Haiti!

Lincoln Park Market has partnered with Park West Community Association to provide survival kits to St. Damien Hospital in Haiti.

St. Damien is a 120-bed free pediatric hospital in Tabarre that cares for more than 200 patients each day. When patients are released from the hospital, they are sent home with a special one-month survival kit that contains basic items to sustain a discharged patient for a month.

With your help, Park West and Lincoln Park Market can pack and ship at least 250 kits to Haiti this summer.

It's easy for you to donate or contribute your time:

Make a Direct Donation. Each kit costs $50, so you can sponsor a kit or give whatever amount you feel you can. Checks should be made out to Friends of the Orphans and can be dropped off or mailed to Lincoln Park Market at 2500 N. Clark Street.

Join me at the Packing Party. Join in this Saturday, July 17th at 10:00 am at Lincoln Park Market (2500 N. Clark) to help pack Survivial Kits. To join in, sign up at the store or email bruce@lincolnparkmarket.com. Please indicate the number of adults and children in your group.

If you have any questions please contact info@parkwestcommunity.com or bruce@lincolnparkmarket.com.

Monday, July 12, 2010

I'm Running

. . . or rather, racewalking, the Chicago Marathon, for charity, and I need you to help me finish the race and meet my goal!

I've certainly learned that there are some things in life that require consistency, dedication, and persistence. One of them is exercise, of which I have not been truly a fan. But since I've taken up racewalking with my club, Chicago Walkers, I've become more fit and have reached some personal goals.

I've never done a marathon - until now. To help keep me motivated throughout the summer, I have dedicated my race to raise money for Rock For Reading, a local non-profit that leverages the power of rock to promote literacy throughout the Chicago area.

Learning to read and write for academic purposes begins at a very young age. Kindergarten through third grade is devoted to learning to read. Beyond third grade, children are transitioned to using reading to learn. Without those skills, their access to information becomes limited. Furthermore, children from low-income families who don't engage in conversation regularly at home enter the fourth grade at a deficit of 8,000 words versus their middle-class peers (Snow, C., Harvard Education Letter, July/August 2005). That is a 60% achievement gap!

Rock For Reading raises awareness about these atrocities of illiteracy as well as provides grants and book donations to agencies and schools serving both children and adults. To learn more about Rock For Reading, check out their website at www.rockforreading.org.

Please show your support for literacy, and my 26.2 mile challenge, by donating to my marathon fundraising campaign. I need to raise $1000. To reach this, consider donating at the marathon level of $26.20 or $1/mile, or more! Of course you are always welcome to give the amount that works best for you. You can donate here.

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

We Were A Hit!

The 43rd Ward Democrats marched well at this year's Pride Parade. We even got coverage on the Channel 7 News Report on the parade. You can check us out at minute 43 (how lucky!) and again just a little bit later.

Our Pride Flag!

Perhaps it was our incredible enthusiasm and perhaps it was our new "Living Pride Flag" that so charmed the crowds and the cameras! If you'd like to be a part of our "flag" next year, just sign up at michele43rd@gmail.com.

The Pride Parade is a wonderful expression of community togetherness and a celebration of equality for all.


Michele Led the Way.

Thanks to all the volunteers who marched along with us and thanks for all the good wishes we encountered along the route. It was great fun!

Friday, June 25, 2010

A Recap of our Forum on Retail Development in Lincoln Park

Here are more details about our panel discussion "The Future of Development in the 43rd Ward."

I called the meeting because I believe the we all need to understand the issues underlying the development problems in the ward. Specific topics of concern:

What about those vacant stores? I counted them. Right now, there are 182 vacant stores in the Lincoln Park area, encompassing 785,000 square feet of space. Here is a list. You can see my 5 minute presentation on those vacancies here.

At the forum, our panel of experts explained why we have all these vacancies and together, we began to get the community involved in finding a solution to the problem. What we learned is, that while some of the problems in retail are of course a results of the economy, the overall picture is far more complex. Here are the key findings:

- Lincoln Park in general is overbuilt in terms of retail. According to our panelists, there is today more existing shopping space than can be supported.

- Most retailers look for proximity to other similar retailers, be it restaurants, clothing stores or other space. Retailers also love density, be it of people or cars. But Lincoln Park has 4,000 fewer families than it had in 1970. We all know many blocks in the neighborhood where traditional three flats were demolished in favor of single family homes. Those fewer families provide a much smaller base for neighborhood shopping. The closing of employers such as the hospitals will further reduce the number of customers for local merchants. We need to bear this in mind as we plan for the future.

- Clark Street has the most retail vacancies around, 32 in a five block area. While there are many property owners on Clark Street, one Dr. Jerry Winkler, formerly of Chicago and now of Los Angeles, is the dominant landlord, owning over 40 storefronts. Our panelists were in agreement that this landlord is a cause of the emptiness of Clark Street. I've concluded that the number of vacancies in his properties has had a cascading effect on our community, discouraging other retailers because of the lack of other businesses. Further, as population in the ward has shifted west, Clark Street may be less attractive for major businesses, but is still important for neighborhood shopping.

- The vacancies on Armitage Avenue are the result of the boom in real estate in the last decade, not the current bust. Speculators bought up the existing successful storefronts, doubled the rents and forced out the local merchants in hopes of bringing in national tenants. These shouldn't be the focus on Armitage, given the competiton from Clybourn, and frankly, suburban shopping. Panelist Diana Epstein explained that there needs to be a balance between local retailers and large chains - but that the community really must support its local retail.

Having said this, all our panelists agreed that Lincoln Park is the most desirable part of the city for retail, and is sought after. In that case, what needs to be done to get the retailers back? Don't we need a plan?

Here's what we proposed:

Community involvement. Panelist Larry Bennett of DePaul stated that research has shown that development in which the community is deeply involved leads to better decisions for that site.

Community action. I am forming a Task Force on Development, focusing first on Clark Street - we'll come up with plans for community action to restore our street. Our 43rd Ward community includes many talented citizens, with ideas from legislation to alliances. Some of the ideas that came up in the forum included: allying with DePaul to provide "incubator" space for new business on Clark Street, creating tax penalties for leaving space vacant, pushing for incentives to help small businesses vs. large city incentives for national chains, and creating temporary uses for vacant space. Sign up to join or get information on the task force at http:///.

Our neighborhood is poised on the brink of its greatest change since gentrification began - and I want you to be educated as to the issues so you can participate in making Lincoln Park the best urban neighborhood in the country.

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Neighbors Write Letter to the Plan Commission

A group of Lincoln Park neighbors have drafted a letter to the Plan Commission stating their strong opposition to the developer's plan for Lincoln Park Hospital. The letter is presented here below:

May 24, 2010

Chicago Plan Commission
Planning and Policy Division
Zoning and Land Use Planning
121 N. LaSalle St. #703
Chicago, IL 60602

Attn: Ms. Linda Searl, Chairman

Dear City of Chicago Planning Department,

We understand that the owners of the former Lincoln Park Hospital site will be meeting or have met with your department to seek approval of a plan for development that has already been roundly rejected by both the community and our alderman, Vi Daley. They are proceeding with their application to the City of Chicago in spite of the following:

• A dozen or so meetings between the developers and neighbors (and our Alderman) where the opposition has been overwhelming--especially from the most affected neighbors and those neighbors in the Mid-North Historic District.

• A petition signed by over 500 neighbors (form of petition attached)

• A strong letter of opposition by the Mid-North Association (attached)

• A January 12 community meeting attended by 300 community members, and overwhelming in opposition to the plan, even with some modifications. Representatives of the Planning Commission present at the meeting heard the objections very clearly to the developer’s proposal.

• Our alderman’s letter to neighbors (attached) and statements at the January 12 meeting voicing support for the neighbors’ position--including three previous legal agreements that restricted development at the site.

We believe the attached letter from the Mid-North Association neatly describes the community’s objections to the plan.

The site is surrounded on three sides by the Mid-North Historic District and a park. It is a residential oasis and Landmark area characterized by three and four story buildings, walkable streets and of course, historic facades. The size of the Lincoln Park Hospital is out of place in the community, and several lawsuits were necessary to restrict its development.

In short:

• The site is completely inappropriate for retail development, and abundant property exists in Lincoln Park to accommodate the proposed stores, even if desirable

• The proposed development is much too dense for the neighborhood, putting 330 units in an area that would support, for example, 42 single family homes or 84 townhouses

• The proposed development would increase traffic and congestion in an already crowded area. The developer’s claimed assertions about traffic at the hospital are inaccurate; the hospital has not been in full operation for 25 years.

• The proposed development robs the neighborhood of open space promised under prior community agreements and is not consistent with the residential zoning of the surrounding neighborhood.

Finally, the developers have also proven themselves to be bad neighbors. Since the community rejected their original proposal, they have fenced off a service driveway long used by the community and City of Chicago garbage and emergency vehicles. They have fenced off a lot dedicated as open space by a prior community agreement, and have closed the garage that they claim would be open for public parking rental even as part of their current proposal.

We request the opportunity to meet with you to discuss our concerns and express our vehement opposition to the developer’s plans.

Thank you for your support.


Very truly yours,


See attached list of neighbors


Cc: Heather Gleason
Sara Sheehan
Alderman Vi Daley
Hon. Richard M. Daley

Saturday, June 5, 2010

Vacant Retail Space in Lincoln Park

I have researched vacant retail space in Lincoln Park and have found 783,533 square feet of vacant already standing space, plus 1,218,458 square feet of available land for development, for a total of almost 2 million square feet of available ground floor retail.

To see see all the data, please go: here

You should see along the top tabs that say Development Opportunities, All Vacancies, Clark Street Vacancies and All Clark St. Retail Properties. Simply click on the tab for the information you would like to see.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Analysis of the Developer’s Proposal to the Plan Commission Regarding the Lincoln Park Hospital Site

As you know, on January 12, 2010, the community rejected the plans presented by the developers of Lincoln Park Hospital. The concerns: retail development in the midst of our historic district, too high and too dense buildings.

The hospital site is what is called a “planned development.” It is not governed by the usual zoning of the area, but is a special type of zoning. Currently, the hospital is zoned for medical uses only. This means that the developers have no right to use the site for anything else. Any change from this zoning requires a plan approved by the City of Chicago Planning Department AND an ordinance from City Council that requires a plan approved by the City of Chicago Planning Department AND an ordinance from City Council.

To give you a feel for the size of this development, it is 131,829 square feet – just over 3 acres. That’s 42 city lots – on which, in previous discussions, the developers have indicated they want to put 330 residential units (for perspective, the Belden Stratford has 300 apartments) 40,000 square feet of office space and over 50,000 square feet of retail. Compared to the surrounding neighborhood of historic single family homes, two-flats and townhouses, that’s just too large.

Notwithstanding this opposition, the developers have recently submitted an application to the Chicago Planning Commission seeking approval for even MORE DENSITY and MORE RETAIL than they told us at the community meeting. I’ve analyzed their proposal, and want to give you the facts.

The Retail Component

At our community meeting, the developer told us that they wanted to build a 19,500 square foot grocery and a 13,500 square feet pharmacy while removing parking spaces from the garage. That was bad enough.

The plan submitted to the Planning Commission offers no details on the amount of retail, square footage. But the developer’s proposal does say that:

“The uses of the Property permitted pursuant to this planned development shall include (a) medical and related uses, (b) residential dwelling units including, without limitation,
dwelling units on the ground floor; and (c) all uses permitted in the B3-2 Community
Shopping District, including, without limitation, residential support services.”
What does that mean?

Under the City of Chicago Zoning Code, the purpose of a “Community Shopping District is to accommodate a very broad range of retail and service uses, often in the physical form of shopping centers or larger buildings. . . . Development in B3 districts will generally be destination-oriented, with a large percentage of customers arriving by automobile. Therefore, the supply of off-street parking will tend to be higher in B3 districts than in B1 and B2 districts.”

“The B3 district is intended to be applied to large sites that have primary access to major streets. It may also be used along streets to accommodate retail and service use types that are not allowed in B1 and B2 districts.”
In fact, under the B3 zoning, while almost all shopping center uses are permitted, housing is a “special use” requiring a zoning approval. Here’s what’s allowed:

Colleges and Universities
Restaurants
Banquets and Meeting Hall
Banks
Food and Beverage Retails sales, with liquor sales as an accessory use
Undertakers
Offices
Medical
Hair Salons, Nail Salons
Dry Cleaners
General Retail Sales – groceries, pharmacies, clothing, etc.
Video Arcades
Residential Storage Warehouse
Auto Supply/Accessory Sales
Auto Sales or Rental
Motor Vehicle Repair Shops
Catering
Entertainment Venue up to 999 seats

Moreover, there are no size limitations on commercial developments in the B3 district up to 75,000 square feet. So, if the developer’s plans don’t go exactly right – a big box store could be coming to Webster Street! And further, the developers seek the right to this zoning in the entire development – so there could be stores on Webster, Geneva and Grant.

But wait, there’s more. In a B3 District, the following types of signs are allowed: free standing, marquee, projecting and neon signs. And the maximum permitted total sign size is 4 times the frontage, or 1500 ft, whichever is less. Flashing and video signs are generally permitted.
In sum, this is a dramatic overreaching by the developers, and a violation of the previous community agreements which stated that use of the property would be consistent with residential (R-5) zoning.

The Residential Component

The developer had originally told us that the want to make an “adaptive reuse” of the hospital tower with about 120 units, put a senior rental residence on Geneva Terrace with about 170 units, and townhouses on Grant.

The developers, however, they have proposed a 150' tower building (12 stories above grade) which is both taller and broader than the existing building, and an 81 foot building on Grant and Geneva, which would appear to allow seven-story building on Grant. The original planned development and the various lawsuits with the neighborhood allowed only 10 stories above grade in the tower, six stories on Geneva, and five stories on Grant. The plans show a 75 foot, six-story building on Geneva Terrace, and the existing building on Geneva is six stories. The building on Grant is to be torn down and replaced, and an 81 foot building would appear to allow another story. Bear in mind, the surrounding zoning for this area allows a maximum height of 45 feet.

As for the two lots on Webster next to the hospital (one of which is the current driveway and other is vacant), they state that the will build R-5 housing, which violated community agreements that the space be kept open.

They state that the number of units would be based on the minimum lot area per unit in RM-5 zoning, which is 400 square feet per unit. Under these limitations, you divide the total area of the development (131,829), divide by 400 = 330 units. In other words, if this entire site were residential, they would be able to build 330 units. As I’ve already stated, the site (both sides of the street, garage included) could hold 42 single family homes, or 82 townhouses, or 42 three flats, or some combination of homes, townhomes, three-flats and apartment buildings. You get the picture. I doubt the community would oppose such a development.

In an RM-5 area, development is also limited by something called the Floor Area Ratio (FAR), which is 2. That means that the total square footage of residential units is twice the lot size. This is to mandate room for yards and front, back and side setbacks. So, as a totally residential development, they would be limited to 263,658 square feet. Again, think of 42 houses of 6000 square feet each (that’s big! – but that’s what is allowed – look at the non-landmarked area); townhouses, and three-flats and four story apartment buildings. As most of the houses in the landmark area are smaller than this, we could argue whether even RM-5 zoning is appropriate for this site.

The next lower classification RM-4.5, has a minimum lot area of 700 square feet per unit, which would allow 188 units and an FAR of 1.7, which would allow a total of 224,209 square feet of housing, or 42 single family homes of 5335 square feet, or townhouses, apartments, etc. You can see how these classifications make a difference.

Here, however, the developer wants to build all of those units on one portion of the site, and put commercial development on both sides of Webster, AND a 300+ space parking garage.
Indeed, The developers also seek “residential support services,” which are “Commercial uses provided primarily to serve the needs of residents in large, multi-unit residential buildings (more than 50 units) or residents within the immediate area,” including restaurants, financial services, food and beverage stores, offices, personal services and general retail sales. But these stores are allowed in R5 residential areas as a matter of right (think of stores on the first floor of high-rises). So the developers are asking for two ways to have commercial space in this development.

Final point – the so-called “adaptive reuse.” As far as we can tell, nothing will be retained from the original structure of the hospital tower except the steel studs. And we now know that they want to add two stories to that structure.

Plus, they want an exemption from the requirements for front and rear setbacks that would otherwise apply to a RM5 district. Thus, the developers want to put all these housing units in our neighborhood with none of the amenities for open space and yards that the rest of the neighborhood enjoys. Instead, the plans show a so-called “green roof” over the garage, which is actually just the backyard space for the units that is built over the underground parking. In some parts of the city, a having a green roof gives the developer permission to build more units, but I do not see a provision in the code for this neighborhood. Perhaps the developers intend to argue for a similar FAR “bonus” for this so-called green roof.

Parking Issues and the Garage on Webster Issues

The drawings of the garage building on Webster are unclear. There appears to be an entrance to a parking garage, a corner large retailer and the rest are either facades, townhouses, or something. There is no description. But as we have already explained, the developers seek authority permission to build large retail with companion shopping. In addition, there will be increased height to the parking garage and parking on the roof, which violates a 1972 and 1986 community agreement, and what they told the community during the community meeting. Parking on the roof will allow parkers to see into the homes surrounding the garage.

The developers state that they will provide only the minimum number of parking spaces required by law. Under the zoning for B3-2 districts, for retail sales, there has to be 2.5 spaces for each 1000 square feet. So for a 20,000 square foot store, they need only provide 50 spaces! Recall that the developers said they wanted to put parking for the senior residences in the garage as well. The code requires .33 spaces per unit. So all they would have to put in is about 40 spaces under their original proposal.

Under the code, the developers would also need 200 spaces for non-elderly housing (one per apartment). While the developers told the community that they would install these spaces underground the development, parking in this area is already limited, and these minimums are no where near adequate. In addition, the garage parking will no longer be available for to the neighborhood and those visiting the local businesses and restaurants.

Further, garage entrances are added and others moved closer to the existing residences, creating new noise problems. The plan adds a truck loading dock on Webster just to the west of the main garage door. Plus, there is an new garage door on the north side at the very east end of the tower building. All of these moves are contrary to the prior agreements with neighbors (the idea previously was ONE garage door as far west as possible to minimize noise and congestion in the neighboring residential area).

Open Space Issues

As proposed, there is essentially no open space in this proposal. The developers seek relief from front, rear and side setbacks for the large residential spaces, and commercial spaces have very limited setbacks.

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Where Are We Headed in the 43rd Ward?

Are You Worried About All the Empty
Storefronts On Clark? Or Wells? Or Armitage?
Are You Concerned About Proposed Development at the Children's Memorial Site?
Wondering What's Happening at Lincoln Park Hospital?

Join Us for a Panel Discussion:
"The Future of Development in the 43rd Ward"
Monday, June 7th
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
St Vincent DePaul Center
2145 N. Halsted
(indoor parking available - enter on Webster)
Hear from Our Panelists:
Michele Smith - 43rd Democratic Ward Committeeman-
Presenter and Panel Moderator
Larry Bennett - DePaul University Professor and
Urban Development Expert
Stan Nitzberg - Mid America Group,Consultant on Block 37 and Adjunct Professor, DePaul University
Diana Epstein - co-founder of Local First Chicago and former Armitage Street business owner
Monee Fields-White - Crain's Chicago, Senior Reporter - Retail and Local Economy Beat

Please RSVP at:
developmentpanel@gmail.com

For more information call 773-661-2133
http://www.43rdwarddemocrats.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Look What We've Accomplished!

Since I was elected Democratic Committeeman of the 43rd Ward in February 2008, I have accomplished many things beyond the scope of a Committeeman’s designated responsibility to run elections. I have kept to my personal mission of educating and informing the voters of the 43rd Ward and increasing voter turnout to a greater extent than has ever been done in the past . We have introduced candidates for office, as well as elected officials, directly to the voters more than any other ward organization, and kept you informed about matters of local and national importance.

In 2010:
• I’m keeping you informed about important developments in the Lincoln Park Hospital development controversy and building public support to keep future development residential
• Our Candidate Fair introduced voters to more than 55 Candidates running for local and statewide offices in the February Primary.
• Our 43rd Ward Democrats endorsed progressive independent candidates for the February Primary. We did thorough research to help you elect the most qualified judges and other candidates in races that receive little press coverage so you could exercise an informed vote.
• On Election Day, we increased voter turnout by 1600 more people than in the late mid-term election in 2006, a 26% increase.
• Our comprehensive research showed how judges are actually selected in Cook County. I took you behind the scenes of the Democratic Party and told you how slating works.

In 2009:
• Over 300 people (and much of the city’s media) covered our County Board President Candidates Forum, moderated by Andy Shaw, former network political reporter and head of the Better Government Association.
• We introduced Candidates for Illinois State Treasurer, State Comptroller and County Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to the voters at our Meet the Candidates Event.
• The 43rd Ward Democrats’ Candidates Forum in the 5th Congressional District Special Election attracted a crowd of more than 700 people.
• Our Hear from Your Elected Officials event, featuring Congressmen Danny Davis and Mike Quigley and State Representatives Sara Feigenholtz and John Fritchey, allowed constituents to get direct answers from their representatives.
• I cast the deciding vote in the Democratic Party slating session to ensure that the 5th Congressional District Special Election race would be an open primary, leaving the decision to the voters of the district instead of party bosses.
• I took independent stands in Democratic Party matters involving slating.
• Our community meetings introduced 43rd ward voters to newly elected Congressman Mike Quigley and newly appointed County Commissioner Bridget Gainer.
• Over 200 people attended our very successful Second Annual Unity Fundraiser.
• Our Petitioning Event gave volunteer support to 18 local and statewide races and put volunteers in direct contact with candidates and campaigns.
• We hosted successful phone banks to support health care reform.

In 2008:
• I hosted the 43rd Ward Democrats First Meeting where Anita Alvarez, Democratic Candidate for State’s Attorney, was introduced to voters.
Voter Registration - We registered more than 1,000 new 43rd Ward voters.
Judge Recruitment – We filled more than 150 Democratic Election Judge slots with a record number of 43rd Ward residents as judges.
First Annual Unity Fundraiser - The evening was a tremendous success and brought together elected officials and residents from all over the ward.
• You went with me to the Democratic Convention in Denver for an on-the-ground look.
• Our packed Rally for Obama generated 100 students and longtime residents to volunteer to make phone calls, go door-to-door and go to Michigan and Wisconsin to help elect Barack Obama.
New Ward Office – opened at 2527 N. Lincoln Avenue.
Our First Election Day – we increased the number of 43rd Ward residents serving as election judges by 100% and a huge number 43rd ward volunteers helped make the day run smoothly.


.

Friday, April 23, 2010

Exciting Neighborhood Events

Celebrate Earth Day at Lincoln Park Zoo
Thursday, April 22
10:00 am - 12:00 noon
Café Brauer at Lincoln Park Zoo (2021 N. Stockton Drive)
This is the Zoo's fifth annual Science Celebration, showcasing student projects that demonstrate how the zoo and the Chicago community serve as a living laboratory.

Green City Market - Indoor Market
Saturday, April 24th
8:00 am - 1:00 pm
South Gallery Notebaert Nature Museum
2430 N. Cannon Drive
"Say Cheese!"
Special cheese vendors will be featured at one of the last indoor markets of the season. Chef demonstrations will be held at 9am, 10am and 11am.

"Vintage 338 - A Wine Bar"
The location may seem familiar...
yes, it's the site of my former campaign office. But, boy has it changed! Come sample a variety of Spanish, Italian and French wines and have a bite at this great new business. Specializing in Southern European Street Food -sandwiches, salads, small plates and more. Located at 338 W. Armitage and open every day from 4:00 pm.

Friday, April 16, 2010

My Personal Lincoln

I turned 55 this past Friday, Lincoln's birthday. Lincoln died at 54, which brought to mind the old joke (by Tom Lehrer) that "it is people like that who make me realize how little I have accomplished. It is a sobering thought for example, that when Mozart was my age, he had been dead two years."

We remember Lincoln for is his accomplishments in his 5 short years as President. But for me, it is interesting that Lincoln dropped out of politics at one point, returning only in middle age.

Lincoln decided on a career in law and politics quite young - he ran for State Representative here in Illinois at 23, winning when he was 24. He served in the Illinois State Legislature (already known in the 1830s as a pretty wild place, where Lincoln once climbed out a window to help prevent a quorum) , and then for one term in the U.S. Congress.

But after one term in the U.S. Congress, Lincoln dropped from the political scene and concentrated on his law practice to earn money for his family. He only returned in his forties, "aroused" as he put it by the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act (which, he argued, would allow slavery in any territory), and in a few short years, became a national figure, and then, President.

Scholars now say that it was the totality of Lincoln's experiences - as a politician, an attorney, as a struggling business owner - that made him so able a leader.

I started my career as a federal prosecutor because I thought it was a good way to make a difference and serve the public. Other life experiences - working for a troubled company, personal troubles, and the like, followed. I might have wished to have entered politics earlier in my life. But I have to say that only those life experiences - as a prosecutor, as a lawyer and as a mother - could have given me the judgment, strength and empathy that I think a public servant should possess.

So perhaps middle age is the right time for anybody to pursue her dream

Did the 43rd Ward Make a Difference?

You bet it did. I've analyzed the results from last week's election, and I am proud of our results.

1600 more people voted than in 2006, a 26% increase over the last primary election. And that made a difference:

THE 43rd WARD HAD THE GREATEST MARGIN OF VICTORY FOR TONI PRECKWINKLE ANYWHERE IN THE CITY OF CHICAGO - 73.3%. City wide Toni received 46% of the vote. We made a critical difference in providing her a victory over those parts of the city that voted for less independent and progressive candidates.

Future State Representative Ann Williams also won the highest margin of victory here in the 43rd Ward- 62% - making a critical difference in her victory.

Judges: The 43rd Ward voted for the highest qualified judges by a wide margin, helping to bring to victory Judge Jim Epstein, future judge Terry MacCarthy, and Judge Ray Mitchell.

And many great candidates - David Hoffman, Raja Krishnamoorthi, Jonathan Goldman and Ray Figueroa - also received their highest margin of victory here. Higher turnout might have carried the day for some of them.

If you want more specifics on the races, check out http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1103023825474&s=3626&e=001EzQ74jR22SybKUqoLNyGX_MqFiYqsDaX-rCB0qJCC0wEE_A2i6Ay5qW3nEeENgJRWBWC4lKahJmvRguqhd4vo3aSJzPJxmPXEEKyTKS_cqInYIhYA38eHdmqbKHXhkgO.

Even though the news reported that voter turnout percentage was low, that is because we have an almost historically high number of registered voters due to the Obama race. If we can increase turnout from the 7600 that did vote in this election, we'll really make a decisive difference in the way our city, county and state is governed.

I hope that you see that your vote, and the 43rd Ward's votes, makes a difference in steering our government towards more independent, progressive candidates. Thank you for your vote, and I hope you join us the next time we have a primary election.

Saturday, January 9, 2010

43rd Ward Democrats Official Endorsements

Governor
Pat Quinn
Lieutenant Governor
Terry Link
Attorney General
Lisa Madigan
Secretary of State
Jesse White
Comptroller
Raja Krishnamoorthi
Treasurer
Justin Oberman
Congress 5th District
Mike Quigley
Congress 7th District
Danny Davis
State Central Committeewoman, 5th District
No Endorsement
State Central Committeeman, 5th District
No Endorsement
State Central Committeewoman, 7th District
Karen Yarbrough
State Central Committeeman, 7th District
Danny Davis
State Senator, 13th District
Kwame Raoul
State Rep 5th District
David Schroeder
State Rep 10th District
Jonathan Goldman
State Rep 11th District
Ann Williams
State Rep 12th District
Sara Feigenholtz
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District
Todd Connor
Mariyana Spyropoulos
Kari Steele
County Board President
Toni Preckwinkle
County Clerk
David Orr
County Sheriff
Tom Dart
County Treasurer
Maria Pappas
County Assessor
Ray Figueroa
County Board Commissioner 2nd District
No Endorsement
County Board Commissioner 10th District
Bridget Gainer
Judge of the Appellate Court, First District (McNulty vacancy)
James Epstein
Judge of the Appellate Court, First District (O'Malley vacancy)
Thomas Hogan
Judge of the Appellate Court, First District (South vacancy)
Sebastian Patti
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Berland vacancy)
William Hooks
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Bronstein vacancy)
Terry MacCarthy
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Dolan vacancy)
Linda J. Pauel
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Hayes vacancy)
Ray Mitchell
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Kelley vacancy)
John Patrick Callahan, Jr.
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (McCarthy vacancy)
Daniel Gallagher
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (O'Malley vacancy)
Thomas Lyons
Judge of the Circuit Court, Full Circuit (Riley vacancy)
No Endorsement

42 Democratic Candidates, Time to Meet Them Face-to-Face, Free Indoor Parking...

...And You're Invited!

Candidate Fair
Tomorrow
Saturday, January 9, 2010
10:00 am - 12:00 noon
St. Vincent De Paul Center
2145 N. Halsted

Free, Warm, Underground Parking Available - Enter on Webster!

Please RSVP, if possible, at michele43rd@gmail.com .

Meet and talk with 42 of the Democratic Candidates who will be on the ballot in the February 2nd Primary.

Invite Your Friends and Neighbors!

Candidates Attending (thus far):

Governor
Dan Hynes
County Board President
Toni Preckwinkle
Dorothy Brown

Treasurer
Justin Oberman
Robin Kelly
Comptroller
Raja Krishnamoorthi
Clint Krislov
David Miller

U.S. Senate
David Hoffman
Jacob Meister
Lieutenant Governor
Rickey Hendon
Scott Lee Cohen
Terry Link
Congress 5th District
Mike Quigley
Congress 7th District
Darlena Williams-Burnett
Jim Ascot
State Central Committeewoman, 7th District
Karen Yarbrough
State Rep 5th District
David Schroeder
State Rep 10th District
Annazette Collins
Eddie Winters
Jonathan Goldman
State Rep 11th District
Ed Mullen
Ann Williams
Dan Farley
State Rep 12th District
Sara Feigenholtz
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District
Todd Connor
Mariyana Spyropoulos
Barbara McGowan
Stella Black
County Sheriff
Sylvester E. Baker
County Board Commissioner 2nd District
Desiree Grode
County Board Commissioner 10th District
Bridget Gainer
Judicial Candidates
Sebastian Patti
Diann Marsalek
Arnette R. Hubbard
James R. Epstein
Thomas L. Hogan
Linda J. Pauel
Joanne F. Fehn
Terry MacCarthy
John Patrick Callahan
Sandra Ramos